Tag Archives: Maya

So the “Mayan” December 21, 2012 Date Is Here and the World Woke Up to Count Down Again…

Today is December 21, 2012.  The infamous Mayan December 21, 2012.

More prophesies of the world’s end did not come true, and December 22, 2012 is waiting in the wings.

I’ve been telling people for years that this is not an “end”…but just the end of a cycle of over 5,000 years that will start itself anew.  Others have said this is also the end of two different Hindu age cycles a grand cycle, and a shorter cycle (the Kali Yuga?).  I’ve listened to many commentators on this subject and find it very interesting.  The most interesting are the ones that say the earth is moving on its path as it always has and that indeed, new “ages” are here, but, well…they’re spiritual in nature.  Or expose us to more light from the center of the galaxy.  Some may feel a little different today.  More tingly.  Some may not.  But we’re all still going to be here.

And we are.

What are your thoughts?  What were your beliefs around this day?  Did you take the day off work?  Did you Google December 21, 2012 or Mayan Calendar this morning as you watched the news or read the paper, or got ready to face day one of the “new” Mayan countdown?

Forget what you “thought” would happen today.  Instead, take 12/21/12 it as an opportunity for a new beginning.  Heck, if you read this, take a moment to take a deep breath and say, “The world is still here, ‘same’ as it ever was.  What can I do to take a new direction?”

Here at Nobody’s View we believe that we are all nobody, and that makes us somebody special.  So, in that spirit, remember that you’re not the special Mayan priest.  You’re not the oracle.  You’re just a person who hit snooze once this morning, got out of bed, and are going into the office or getting the kids off to school here on December 21, 2012, the end of a Mayan cycle and the start of another.

Take the days as they come.  Count the days to Christmas.  Count down to the new year.  Make a new dish to eat.  Make it a date night.  Leave your phone on silent.  Watch a good foreign film.  Practice Ho’oponopono like you really mean it.  If that’s not for you, try yoga, tennis, or golf.  Take up the guitar.  Remember the good times and make a strong commitment to the future.  Read a good book.  Read a bad book.  Read a book that you’ve heard is both (50 Shades of Grey?).  If you love the ocean, hike in the mountains.  If you’re a mountain person, take a dip.  Read about the Mayans, or book a trip to Mexico and see the ruins for yourself.

The point is, the sun rose today.  Some have said the earth is now cresting and more light and energy are bombarding us.  Good stuff.  Believe it?  Great.  Don’t believe it?  Well, you can still make a new start.  You can still shine a little light in your own world.

Folks, we’re all nobody.  We’re all somebody.  We’re what makes the world go ’round in our little corners of the vast universe.

This December 21, 2012, make the most of it.  Oh, and here’s the secret.  Do the same thing on December 22, 2012.

Newtown, Connecticut Shooting Puts the Year Behind, and the Year Ahead, in a New Perspective

It’s usually at this time of year when I write my yearly round-up.  I mean, not that anyone gives a lick, but I like to write it.  It makes me feel better about things, and it always helps to get some perspective going into a fresh 365 days.

There’s nothing wrong with that, right?

And, after all, the Mayans are telling us the end is near (it’s not–it’s actually a new beginning) this December 21, 2012, so…I felt like it was time to do it.

But I held off for the last few days.  I didn’t write it until today.

Why?

Well, the December 14 school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut.  26 killed.  I realized that the year behind, and the year ahead, were already squarely in perspective.

I read an article about the global outpouring of support for the victims’ families and the Newtown community and it really got me thinking, again, about the line we walk in our world between global animosity and global togetherness.  We are so close to being a world community.  The reason we seem so far apart is likely not due to your average person’s difference of opinion, but more to do with unfortunate leadership around the world.

People on their own are generally good.  At least, that’s what I choose to believe.  If you need help in a parking lot or at the side of the road, most good Samaritans won’t ask your political affiliation or your view on the Second Amendment, abortion, or the last election.  They’ll just assist.  If you drop a dollar, many people will pick it up and yell, “Hey!  Wait!”

Most people.  Not all.

We don’t generally have litmus tests for basic assistance or casual acquaintance.  Some do, yes.  Many don’t.  If you’re American and dining in Canada, the service will be like it is for any Canadian.  At a resort in Mexico, it’s okay to speak Russian.  Indian curries are fine to cook in Italy, and I had darn good roast beef in Kenya many years ago even though I’ve experienced it in an NYC deli as well.  We share religions across borders, appreciate or take on foreign customs, and see movies about events that take place many miles, or countries, away.

Not everyone is on board with this.  Some are.  That’s fine.

So, when I think about Newtown in what Paul Simon might call this “deep and dark December,” I prefer to think about the outpouring of support from around the globe.  Of the prayers that go out to those we don’t know.  Nobody I know really cares if the victims were Muslim, Christian, Hindu, or whatever.  We all turned on the TV to see the shock of lives lost.  Not Christian lives lost, but lives.  Not Buddhist children lost, but children.  Tragically.  And worthy of memory.

As I sit here now and reflect back on this year, I see it was full of ridiculous stars full of themselves saying ridiculous things.  There were new launches of more TV shows about people famous for being famous.  I encountered darkness in the least likely of places, but then again, also saw light in unexpected corners of my days.  There was work in places I never thought I’d return, but then there was another job waiting right where I’d left it last January 1.  There was a third job that came from nowhere.  All around there was a bad economy, racism, hatred, bigotry, a hotly contested election, people living lives with bold attachment to lies when the truth was just a simple channel click, book, or class away.  There were those that screamed, and still insist, we should never help others, even in circumstances beyond their control, but there was also a policeman that put shoes right where they belonged and people pulling together in the aftermath of a terrible storm.  Some came down from the ledges of hard life.  Some jumped into a new adventure.  Some moved on for new adventures and some stayed firmly entrenched in their old prisons while the keys to freedom were dangling just outside their self-imposed cells.  I learned some new things, let go of some old, read new books from friends and discarded old book ideas of my own.  Blood, tears, death, and taxes all made their appearances, but so did new nieces and fresh ideas.  I wasn’t always happy.  I wasn’t always sad.  I helped.  I sat idle.  I received help.  I prayed.  I sent prayers.  I knew I was on a good road even when others thought I had somehow missed a really important turnoff.  Thank goodness I kept driving.

But then, there is Newtown, Connecticut.  And it all snaps into place again.  All possibilities collapse into one moment in December when fame, fortune, freedom, and fallacy don’t matter.  It’s all about a different energy.  I can’t describe it yet, but it was clear while watching the news last Friday.

I’m going to move into the new year the same way I always (try to) do.  With a sense of optimism, confidence in my decisions, and a desire to do a little better.  No, not how someone else with an agenda of their own thinks I need to do better, but how my gut tells me I need to do better.  Usually, people who tell you how you’re mistaken or screwed up are only trying to sell you their own version of events or brand of regret and…well…no thanks.  You can put that advice in your pocket!

So, let me leave you with this: A happy holiday season.  A happy Hanukkah to my Jewish readers.  A blessed Christmas season for my Christian readers.  A happy Kwanzaa for my readers who celebrate.  And a happy travel down your chosen paths, whatever they are.

Let’s remember the most recent tragedy in America so we can figure out how we might move into 2013 with a different energy.  Let’s take a look at an event that matters, so that we know what we need to be in a different mindset this coming 365…a mindset of support, regardless of personal characteristics that, quite frankly, pale in comparison to what we have that we can share.